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Posts Tagged ‘home care’

Finding Good home Care for Your Aging Parent.

Many people are now finding themselves placed in a new role of caregiver for an aging parent or loved one. Naturally, you want to provide the very best living environment for your aging parent, but there may come a time when you just can’t do it alone. If you want to make sure your parent can continue safely living at home, in home care may be the perfect answer for your family, prior to moving to an assisted living facility or a nursing home. So, how do you find the right professional in-home care for your aging loved one? When…

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Long Distance Caregiving

Taking care of your aging parent can be difficult, even if you live right down the road. But when you live out of state, those difficulties can grow exponentially. How can you make sure their needs are met? Preparation.  Visit with a Purpose. If you can, take an extended trip so you have ample time to assess how your parents are coping. Particularly review: Hygiene Eating habit How they’re getting around Their social interaction Are they taking care of their business (bills, medications, etc.)? Make Arrangements. If you notice your parent having difficulties, consider getting them a home health aide….

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Caring for a Loved One with Alzheimer’s Disease?

Do you know where most of the millions of people who have Alzheimer's disease live? The answer, at home. Consequently, family and friends provide almost 75% of their care. That's why caregiving has been called the fastest growing unpaid profession in the United States. According to the National Alliance for Caregiving, during the past year more than 67 million Americans provided care to a family member, friend, or loved one, many of whom are suffering from different stages of Alzheimer's disease or some other type of dementia. If you're a caregiver, you know first-hand what it's like: Getting swept up…

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Caring for a loved one is both physically and mentally challenging.

Physical limitations make a person much more difficult to attend to. Especially, if they are totally bedridden. Therefore, speak with the physician and have it explained exactly what undertaking their needs involves. Consequently, you may find that you may not be able to handle their condition. First of all, caring for a parent should be a family decision. Your spouse, children, and siblings should all be willing to play some role. Because, a support system is necessary. Therefore, if you have no offers of help and you cannot handle the condition, nursing home placement should be considered. Allowing your heart…

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Frequently Asked Questions that may help to address some of your concerns when working with a home care organization.

Below is a list of Frequently Asked Questions that may help to address some of your concerns when working with a home care organization: What is your mission? How long have you been in business and how long have you served this area? What types of clients do you serve? What level of care do you provide? What level of employee do you employ (are they employees or independent contractors) and how many? What is your experience working with older adults? Do you specialize in any specific area of need/service? Do you provide community setting care in addition to in-home…

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10 signs that your aging parent may might require help at home.

Following are 10 signs that your aging parent may might require help at home: A change in appearance or condition of the home — If your parents never cared much about the house, the fact that it’s a little messier than usual might not indicate a problem. However, if the house was always spotless, a messy home may be a cause for concern.  Clutter – Piles of magazines or clothing could be an indicator that an older adult needs more help. Dirty or unkempt clothing – Lack of interest in appearance can be a sign of depression in a senior….

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Before You Leave The Hospital

Hospital discharge personnel must tell you what level of care is required after you leave the hospital. Also, you need to know what medications and therapies should be taken and when. Suppose family members are told that 24-hour-a-day supervision is needed; then you should ask if this means assisted living or some other interpretation. Additionally, if medications change when in the hospital, find out what should be taken and when. You should control your own placement. Before you leave the hospital, you or your family should know where you want to go. Do not depend exclusively on someone inside the…

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Adult Daycare Center versus Home Care

Adult daycare centers and in-home senior care are both excellent choices that permit elderly and disabled adults to live at home rather than move into a nursing home or assisted living facility. In order to make the best choice for your family, it’s helpful to learn what each offers before deciding which best suits your situation. Either choice allows family caregivers to: • Keep a full or part-time job; • Have help with the physical needs involved with care; • Obtain respite from what can be a 24-hour responsibility; • Reclaim your relationship as spouse, son or daughter rather than…

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Sometimes deteriorating physical or health may make independent living impossible..

In the not too distant past residential options, for your aging parents, were a move to a nursing home or living with you. However, times have changed with assisted living facilities and home care agencies. Consequently, these options can potentially provide a new lease on life, for your parents, whether it be for a short time or for many years. Home care varies, depending on your parent’s needs and resources, from full-time or part-time assistance. Are you're parents unsteady on their feet, a fall risk, not taking their medications, eating enough, require some caregiving assistance, or help with housework? Therefore,…

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Compensation to Family Caregivers.

Growing numbers of aging parents are compensating their caregiving family members. However, it is important to disclose such caregiving agreements to the entire family, to avoid potential disgruntled and unhappy siblings, and the threat of a lawsuit. According to a report by the National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP, 43.5 million Americans looked after a friend or relative age 50 or older in 2009, 28% more than in 2004. "Obviously with the economy, we have seen many seniors retain their adult children rather than pay a home care agency or another person for their care,” states David Wingate of Senior…

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