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Posts Tagged ‘Alzheimer’s disease’

Dealing With Alzheimer’s Disease

We all know that the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or some other type of dementing disease is one of the most dreaded things that an individual can experience.  But what happens next is equally bad:  where do you turn for information, what can and can’t you do, when is it safe to drive or be out?  There are no easy answers, but everything does not have to be as negative and clinical as some medical practitioners make it out to be.  Some people have started informal social groups to help deal with the new diagnosis and how to do things….

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New Resource On Dementia Care

Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia are among the most significant issues facing the elderly and their loved ones. Because people with dementia often lose the ability to communicate over time, they are especially vulnerable and need special care. To help improve care and the public’s understanding of dementia care standards, the Long Term Care Community Coalition (LTCCC) has developed a new brochure designed especially for families and individuals affected by Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. This resource, Get the Facts about Antipsychotic Drugs and Dementia Care, developed with support from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, will…

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Defense of Assumption of Risk Bars Claim in In-Home Caregiver’s Negligence Action Against Alzheimer’s Patient (Cal. App.)

Bernard Cott contracted with a home care agency to provide the services of an in-home caregiver to care for his wife, defendant Lorraine Cott, who suffered from Alzheimer's disease. Lorraine injured the caregiver, Carolyn Gregory, who thereupon sued Lorraine for battery and Lorraine and Bernard for negligence and premises liability. The court entered summary judgment for the Cotts on the ground of primary assumption of risk. On appeal, the decision was affirmed. The court stated that, as a general rule, persons have a duty to use due care to avoid injury to others, and may be held liable if their…

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Tips to help concerned individuals speak with their loved one about a possible need for memory screening.

While the Alzheimer’s research is encouraging, there is a long way to go before Alzheimer's disease is considered preventable. The best treatment for Alzheimer's right now is to catch it early and then work to slow the symptoms. Alzheimer's disease is diagnosed via an extensive evaluation done by a qualified clinician, looking to rule out other potential causes of the symptoms of dementia. There is also a basic memory screening test which can evaluate language skills, memory, and cognitive abilities. While it cannot detect Alzheimer's definitively at this time, the basic memory screening test can indicate whether further screening is…

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Sundowning Planning

Although the causes of sundowning are unknown,  a plan can be made to reduce most of the difficulties that occur. Normal sundowning typically lasts for a couple of hours and, usually, does not involve destruction of property nor physical attacks on others. However, the caregiver must refrain from being agitated, needy, upset, and angry. Sundowning in an adult is like a tantrum in a small child. It represents real feelings, but requires a calm, kind, centered adult response. Remind yourself that it will pass, and listen carefully, because the emotional meaning within the sundowning is real. While nobody knows the actual…

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There are dozens of causes of dementia and steps for prevention are different for each one.There are no proven preventive strategies for Alzheimer’s. However, some top strategies to keep your brain healthy are listed below. 1. Vascular risks: Minimize your risk for strokes, heart disease and diabetes (keep your body weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar in normal range). Studies find strong links between vascular risks and Alzheimer’s. 2. Exercise regularly: Regular aerobic activities, such as walking, may reduce risk for dementia by keeping the brain’s blood vessels healthy, boosting nerve growth chemicals and slowing age-related brain shrinkage. 3. Stimulate…

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Making the Holiday Season Happy for Seniors and Caregivers

The holiday season can be such a wonderful time for family and friends to share together; it is a time for creating memories and honoring family traditions. Unfortunately, the holiday season can also be a stressful and depressing time for many seniors. Seniors can feel confused and isolated during the holidays but there are ways to make this a much more enjoyable time for them by following a few guidelines. Seniors can feel confused and isolated during the holidays… Holidays are a time when memories can be shared. Engage your aging family member in the re-counting of stories and memories…

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The Bad News: Dementia Cases Expected to Triple Worldwide by 2050

Across the globe, more than 35 million people are living with dementia, according to recent World Health Organization (WHO) estimates. This number is expected to more than triple to reach 115 million by 2050 in the wake of world population aging. Fueled by declines in fertility and increases in life expectancy, the share of the world's population ages 65 and older is on track to jump from 8 percent today to nearly 17 percent in 2050, according to new U.S. Census Bureau population projections. By 2050, the population of every world region except Africa will resemble Europe's today, with elderly…

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We are supporting the National Memory Screening Day (NMSD)

We are supporting the National Memory Screening Day (NMSD), an annual initiative of the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) in which qualified health care professionals at local sites nationwide provide free, confidential memory screenings and educational materials to the public. NMSD is also intended to educate the public about “successful aging,” including the benefits of proper diet, physical exercise, mental stimulation, and stress management. Last year, over 96,500 people participated in NMSD at over 2,540 sites nationwide. This is a 12 percent growth over the previous year’s participation, and demonstrates the growing public awareness of the value of early detection…

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The Good News: Genetically Altered Mouse May Help Lead to Alzheimer’s Advances

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine have developed a transgenic mouse that carries a human gene known to increase risk of Alzheimer's 15-fold. This new mouse mimics the genetics of the human disease more closely than any of the dozen existing mouse models and may prove more useful in the development of candidate drugs to prevent or treat the disease. The new mouse model provides new evidence for the earliest cause of Alzheimer's, researchers report in a study to be published in the December issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, and now available online….

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