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Posts Tagged ‘Alzheimer’s’

The Walk To End Alzheimer’s on Oct. 21 at Maryland School for the Deaf, Frederick, MD

The National Alzheimer’s Association, the largest not-for-profit health organization in the United States, is organizing The Walk to End Alzheimer’s. The Western Maryland Region will be hosting one of the walks on Oct. 21 at Maryland School for the Deaf, 101 Clarke Place, Frederick, MD. The Elder Law Office of David Wingate is walking at the event. Registration at 1pm, Opening Ceremony at 2pm, Walk at 2:30pm — 3 Mile Route or 1 Mile Route Available The Alzheimer’s Association is a donor-sponsored organization.  Those participating in The Walk to End Alzheimer’s raises funds that support the fight against Alzheimer’s. The…

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Coping with stigma created by people living with the Alzheimer’s disease

In response to the Report and to honor of World Alzheimer’s Month, the Alzheimer’s Association is unveiling tips for coping with stigma created by people living with the disease. Current and former members of the Alzheimer’s Association National Early-Stage Advisory Group developed these tips based on their personal experiences: Be open and direct. Engage others in discussions about Alzheimer’s disease and the need for prevention, better treatment and an eventual cure. Communicate the facts. Sharing accurate information is key to dispelling misconceptions about the disease. Whether a pamphlet or link to online content, offer information to help people better understand…

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Retired pro football players seem to have higher-than-average risks of dying from Alzheimer’s.

Retired pro football players seem to have higher-than-average risks of dying from Alzheimer's or Lou Gehrig's disease, states Reuters. In a study of more than 3,400 retired National Football League (NFL) players, the researchers found that death rates from the two brain diseases were four times higher than those in the general U.S. population. The researchers, from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), cannot be sure of the reasons. But they suspect they could be looking at the long-term consequences of repeat concussions during players' careers. "This study cannot establish cause-and-effect," said lead researcher Everett J. Lehman….

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The High Emotional—And Financial—Cost of Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s is a disease that affects everybody it touches—husbands, wives, children and grandchildren—they all bear witness to their loved one’s slow demise. Sadly, emotional stress is not the only stress that accompanies Alzheimer’s disease; those loved ones serving as caretakers may carry a huge amount of financial stress as well. The cost of caring for an Alzheimer’s patient can run anywhere from $64 a day to over a $100,000 a year, and because Alzheimer’s disease can be such a long-lasting disease (a person can suffer from Alzheimer’s for up to 20 years) the costs of care can end up being…

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The U.S. government has set a target, to effectively treat and prevent Alzheimer’s disease, by the year 2025.

The Brandon Sun reports that the U.S. government has put in place the USA's first ever National Alzheimer's Plan. The primary objective is to develop a treatment for Alzheimer's disease. The secondary objective is centered on finding ways to provide more effective day-to-day care for dementia symptoms. Alzheimer's is a disease that attacks the brain. It is the most common form of dementia. However, there is no cure for the disease, which worsens as it progresses, and eventually leads to death. The Washington Times notes that at this stage the plan has not been presented in detail of how it…

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Wishful Thinking is Not a Treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease

Wishful thinking isn’t a treatment option states Fiftyplus.com. We know early detection and treatment are crucial for any disease and Alzheimer’s disease is no exception. While there isn’t a cure, finding the disease in its earlier stages means better hope for treatment — but it also gives families more time to find the support they need and plan for the future. Unfortunately a new survey warns that many people aren’t heeding the warning signs of Alzheimer’s — and they’re not seeking help soon enough. The survey was commissioned by the Alzheimer’s Society, as part of its Let’s face it! [1]…

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Reminiscing can help an Alzheimer’s patient remember past

Recovered memories can be as revealing to families as to patients. Today's mobile technology is prompting offspring to embark on projects documenting their parents' lives before dementia takes its course states an article in the USA Today. Recording life stories is one way for patients and families to foster and hold onto memories. "Reminiscing is the success of people with dementia," states the Alzheimer's Association. Evoking memories can be as casual as asking a parent to tell a story, or as formal as a professionally produced video. However,  the extent of the project depends on the patient. Memories can be…

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Don’t Dismiss the early signs of dementia as normal aging.

Too many seniors are dismissing the early signs of dementia as “normal aging.” Diagnosing the disease early can potentially delay its progression, as well provide valuable time to help families cope and determine how to care for their loved one over time. Unfortunately, though, elders and families are waiting too long to ask their doctor about their symptoms, since the warning signs come and go. A survey of nearly 1,000 caregivers of Alzheimer’s patients revealed half of patients waited a year or longer after symptoms began showing before consulting a doctor. Nearly 16 percent waited more than two years. The…

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Knowing the warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease is important because it may lead to an early diagnosis

Knowing the warning signs of Alzheimer's disease is important because it may lead to an early diagnosis, experts say. According to the Alzheimer's Association, early diagnosis enables patients to: Plan ahead for the future. Potentially take part in a clinical drug trial. Start treatments that may help maintain independence for a longer time and possibly improve symptoms. Be involved in decisions about their care, living options, financial and legal matters. Cultivate relationships with doctors and care partners. Take advantage of care and support services that make it easier for patients and families to manage the disease. Alzheimer's disease, a progressive…

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Employees with Dementia?

As baby boomers age — and economic upheaval keeps people in the workforce longer — the issue of how to deal with employees with dementia and cognitive impairment will continue to be kicked around the nation’s courtrooms and boardrooms. Do you have a loved one with dementia? If the statistics hold, many more of us will have loved ones with dementia in the future. Unfortunately, with workers (who still have employment) staying on the job well into retirement, that means we will have many co-workers with dementia, too. A recent story out of DeKalb County (i.e., Atlanta) illustrates this coming…

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