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Posts Tagged ‘aging parent’

Will you Be Responsible For Your Parents Nursing Home Bill?

Everyone with elderly parents visualizes the day their parents become ill and need extended care – from a lengthy hospital stay to 24/7 nursing home care. Parental support laws, of "filial support" may leave the children of these patients with a hefty bill – in the event they should pass away. Many children of elderly parents fear being stuck with an astronomical bill should their parents need long-term health care of 24/7 nursing. The law currently on the books in 29 states and Puerto Rico allow long-term care providers to pursue payment from a parent's adult children. A professor of…

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Pay close attention to your aging parents on a holiday visit this year.

Does the normally tidy house now seem neglected? Is there hoarding? Do you notice memory problems, confusion or physical unsteadiness? Discovering that a parent's physical or mental health is declining can be heavy on the heart. It also can be hard on your finances, states the Wall Street Journal. "The first thing is don't panic. "Come up with a plan." Feeling overwhelmed may prompt you to spend money on the wrong things, such as full-time care, when your parent just needs delivered meals or someone to run errands a few times a week. Here are some tips: 1. Assess needs…

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Dealing with Your Aging Parent

Recent studies show that doctors have more influence on an aging person's decision to stop driving than the person's family does. But if you can’t speak to the doctor, there are a number of topics that, if not handled correctly, can cause division between an aging parent and their children. Is it safe for the parent to drive? Is the parent taking proper care of themselves or their pets? Should the parent consider moving into an assisted living center? There are ways for the children to handle these topics in a sensitive way. In some ways, these conversations need to…

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Making the decision to move a parent out of the home can hurt.

A decade ago, at least one part of that transition wasn't so tough. When the for-sale sign went up, an eager buyer was likely to show up with a good offer. But today, families are facing a much more difficult real estate environment. Home Prices Collapse … Home prices are down more than 30 percent from their peak in 2006, according to the S&P/Case-Shiller 20-City Composite Home Price Index. Over the past five years, home prices have plunged by roughly a third. During that same period, the annual cost of residing in an assisted-living facility has increased 5.7 percent per…

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Finding Good home Care for Your Aging Parent.

Many people are now finding themselves placed in a new role of caregiver for an aging parent or loved one. Naturally, you want to provide the very best living environment for your aging parent, but there may come a time when you just can’t do it alone. If you want to make sure your parent can continue safely living at home, in home care may be the perfect answer for your family, prior to moving to an assisted living facility or a nursing home. So, how do you find the right professional in-home care for your aging loved one? When…

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Your Aging Parent Runs Out of Money?

Your parents are living into their 90’s. Their savings have been depleted on the cost of care. Consequently, the only assets are their income, maybe a pension and Social Security. However, they still are at home, and need help with cooking, shopping and bathing.  You receive a phone call, “I just don’t have enough to pay the caregiver next month.” What will you do? The savings are exhausted. Federal, State and Local Government programs have been cut. Medicare and Medicaid will not pay for the caregiver. Consequently, they may not get any help at all, unless they are in a…

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Caring for a Loved One with Alzheimer’s Disease?

Do you know where most of the millions of people who have Alzheimer's disease live? The answer, at home. Consequently, family and friends provide almost 75% of their care. That's why caregiving has been called the fastest growing unpaid profession in the United States. According to the National Alliance for Caregiving, during the past year more than 67 million Americans provided care to a family member, friend, or loved one, many of whom are suffering from different stages of Alzheimer's disease or some other type of dementia. If you're a caregiver, you know first-hand what it's like: Getting swept up…

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What are Caregiving Contracts?

“Caregiving Contracts” are legal documents between your aging parent and a family member that spells out in very specific details the kinds of services and tasks the caregiver will provide, over what course of time and the rate of pay for the services performed by the caregiver.     If you choose this option, I highly recommend using an elder law lawyer to draft up the contract and that other family members, especially siblings, should be aware of what is being agreed upon. To prevent conflicts, this type of arrangement should be transparent to all family stakeholders invested in your parent’s…

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Caring for a loved one is both physically and mentally challenging.

Physical limitations make a person much more difficult to attend to. Especially, if they are totally bedridden. Therefore, speak with the physician and have it explained exactly what undertaking their needs involves. Consequently, you may find that you may not be able to handle their condition. First of all, caring for a parent should be a family decision. Your spouse, children, and siblings should all be willing to play some role. Because, a support system is necessary. Therefore, if you have no offers of help and you cannot handle the condition, nursing home placement should be considered. Allowing your heart…

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10 signs that your aging parent may might require help at home.

Following are 10 signs that your aging parent may might require help at home: A change in appearance or condition of the home — If your parents never cared much about the house, the fact that it’s a little messier than usual might not indicate a problem. However, if the house was always spotless, a messy home may be a cause for concern.  Clutter – Piles of magazines or clothing could be an indicator that an older adult needs more help. Dirty or unkempt clothing – Lack of interest in appearance can be a sign of depression in a senior….

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