aid-and-attendance benefit pays a maximum of $1,949 a month to qualified married veterans.

Millions of wartime veterans and their families are failing to take advantage of a government benefit that could help them pay for long-term care, says the Wall Street Journal. The Department of Veterans Affairs aid-and-attendance benefit pays a maximum of $1,949 a month to qualified married veterans. Eligible single veterans and surviving spouses receive lower payments.

Most veteran’s children aren't aware of the benefit. Kathryn Ann McKenzie's 93-year-old father, Harry "Mac" McKenzie, suffers from Alzheimer's disease. On a tour of Sunrise of Frederick Frederick, Md., Ms. McKenzie mentioned that her father was a World War II veteran—a cartographer and first sergeant in charge of 400 men who made maps from aerial photographs used in the invasion of Normandy.

Companies, such as Senior Life Care Planning helps families receive the aid and attendance – veterans benefit.

Ms. McKenzie's father now receives about $1,600 a month, tax-free, through the VA program to help meet his assisted-living facility expenses of $5,500 and his additional medical care and insurance premiums, Ms. McKenzie says.

To increase your monthly income, please contact us about a FREE HANDBOOK about VA Benefits, written by David Wingate, an accredited VA Attorney, of Senior Life Care Planning, LLC, go to info@seniorlcp.com or if you require additional information about VA Benefits, visit our Senior LCP's Website.

We also have a Blog on Elder Issues and Veteran's Benefits.

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