Everyone who needs to wear a bracelet for dementia, diabetes, heart condition should wear one.

New bracelets and other medical-identification systems can fill in first responders on practically a patient's complete health history, states the Wall Street Journal. They're a far cry from the simple identification bracelets of the past, which with a few engraved words informed medics that a person was, perhaps, allergic to penicillin. They can steer first responders to a secure website or toll-free phone number, or initiate a text message, to get the medical and prescription history of a patient who may be unconscious or unable to talk about their condition.

Of course, wearing the traditional clunky metal medical-alert bracelets might be a turnoff to some, and too visible a reminder of a disease or condition. That's one reason a number of jewelry companies make bracelets, necklaces and watches that look like real bling—Tiffany & Co. has a gold bracelet for $2,250, for instance—and some pendants can easily be hidden under clothes.

I’m not advocating that everyone run out to Tiffany and Co. but everyone who needs to wear a bracelet for dementia, diabetes, heart condition should wear one.

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