an increasing number of people will have to remain employed past their anticipated retirement age.

While skimming the news this week, I noticed a CNN Health article with some thoughts and advice worth sharing here. With the economy the way it is and with the benefits available from Social Security and Medicare in question, an increasing number of people will have to remain employed past their anticipated retirement age. Indeed, there already is talk of raising the retirement age itself (and this is something to watch in Congress). The more elderly in the workforce the greater the problem of their senescence becomes, and in particular this means that dementia and Alzheimer’s are going to become more problematic. As it is, more than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer’s, and that is expected to quadruple by 2050.

                This is something to keep in mind while on the job, both for the sake of business and for the sake of the health and livelihoods of employees. If you are of retirement age and susceptible to Alzheimer’s (e.g., family history), then stay alert for warning signs. Medical professionals believe early detection is key to staying in control and holding the condition at bay. In addition, if you are co-workers with such a person, know the early detection symptoms (since you will be able to see what they cannot).

                Unfortunately, Alzheimer’s and dementia can be hard to detect since they move in so slowly. An early warning sign is the tendency to forget times or dates. While this may seem innocuous at first, it may be prudent to visit your local Alzheimer’s Association and obtain in formation regarding what Alzheimer’s is. For a little advice that can benefit everyone, take a moment to check out Health.com to learn How to Age-Proof Your Memory.

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